New Tour Dates Added- VA & The Stone Pony!

New dates have been added to the Fall 2017 Tour!

 

10/28- Two and Ghost (House)- Norfolk, VA

11/3- The Stone Pony- Asbury Park, NJ *Homecoming Show

 

"Party time! Excellent" -Wayne Cambell 

Fall 2017 Tour UPDATED

New singles- Fall 2017 Tour

We are very excited to show you our first two singles: Empty Passenger Seats, and Another Deadbeat Summer (2017), along with our Fall 2017 Tour Dates! More being added every day! Stay tuned for more! Enjoy the new songs! Just the beginning, folks!

Empty Passenger Seats // Another Deadbeat Summer [2017]

9/28 New Brunswick, NJ

9/29 Smithtown, NY

9/30 Somerville, MA

10/6 Asbury Park, NJ

10/7 New York, NY

10/13 New Brunswick, NJ

10/14 Bloomfield, CT

10/18 Monaca, PA

10/19 Akron, OH

10/21 Murfeesboro, TN

10/22 Memphis, TN

10/24 Atlanta, GA

10/25 Birmingham, AL

10/26 Augusta, GA

10/27 Wilmington, NC

Photos by Kelsey Ayres

Art by Rich Weinberger and Elijah Reiss

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House of Independents Show Announced for 8/31 with Special Guests!

House of Independents 8/31

We are thrilled to announce that Bobby Mahoney and the Seventh Son will be headlining the gorgeous House of Independents in Asbury Park on August 31st with Special Guests: A Boy Named John, The Vaughns, and Deaf Rhino! Tickets are available at the HOI Box Office, on Ticket Web here, or in person through one of the band members! We can mail and/or deliver tickets! You do not want to miss this show! More surprises and exciting things to be announced!

Colton Kayser and Bobby Mahoney 2017 Spring Tour

Colton and I are very excited to announce that we are hitting the road this month! 

Northeast friends, come hang! We would love to see you!

-more info on the Shows page-

Colton Kayser and Bobby Mahoney Spring 2017 Tour

Well, That Escalated Quickly

Well...that escalated quickly! 7 shows in 8 days, plus other extracurriculars! Hang onto your hats and undergarments. 

3/1 At 11:30pm tune into Jersey Rock on 95.9 WRAT to hear a track off "Shot in the Dark" and an interview! 

3/2 WRAT Jersey Rock Showcase at The River Rock- Brick, NJ w Wynward, Experiment 34, and Julian Fulton and the Zombie Gospel 7-11pm **free show**

3/3 Asbury Hotel w Sunday Blues and Ian Bamberger 8-11pm *JUST ADDED* **free show**

3/4 Bube's Brewery- Mount Joy, PA w Froth, Pink Mexico, Tyler Burkhart, Don Babylon 

3/6 Be Here Now- Muncie, IN **free show**

3/7 The Buzzbin- Canton, OH

3/8 The Station- Garwood, NJ *acoustic* 8-10pm

3/9 Brighton Bar- Long Branch, NJ w Doug Zambon, Johnny Ott, Joey Affatato, Dan Amato, and Deaglan Howlett *acoustic*

We even have some more surprises up our sleeves coming soon. Stay tuned. We love ya. Thanks for all the continued support, and hope to see you somewhere!

 


Reckless Tour 2017 Dates Announced!

Hitting the road!

Reckless Tour 2017 Dates Announced!

We are very excited to be doing cool things with a bunch of great artists these next couple of months! This is just the tip of the iceberg. Much more to come. It is going to be Reckless™! 
See you out there!

2/17 J House- NB, NJ w/ A Boy Named John, Man Dancing, and Jean Pool. 8pm//$5

2/24 Josie House- Richmond, VA w The Smirks, Graveside Breakfast, and Idiot-Proof

3/2 WRAT Jersey Rock Showcase at The River Rock- Brick, NJ w Wynward, Experiment 34, and Julian Fulton and the Zombie Gospel

3/4 Bube's Brewery- Mount Joy, PA

3/6 Be Here Now- Muncie, IN

3/7 The Buzzbin- Canton, OH

3/8 The Station- Garwood, NJ *acoustic

3/9 Brighton Bar- Long Branch, NJ w Johnny Ott, Doug Zambon, Joe Affatato, and Dan Amato

3/25 Chubby Pickle- Highlands, NJ

3/29 Arlene's Grocery NYC

4/1 Dingbatz- Clifton, NJ w Broken Past and more

more dates tba

Bobby Mahoney and the Seventh Son Release New Album "Shot in the Dark"!

Shot in the Dark is the 3rd full-length studio album by Bobby Mahoney and the Seventh Son

The band said, "We wanted to record an album that showcased this band in its current line-up, with a live, raw, and "reckless" sound. This is the result of those pursuits."

The album was recorded, mixed, and mastered at William Paterson University by Joe Larkin.

“There's a lot to gleam from "Shot in the Dark," but perhaps its most exhilarating quality is its promise of more…the record offers as much or more as ever. The words, notes, and motifs mark another step forward for the band…The guitars and vocals are present, and the drums and bass groove deeply [and] Mahoney's direction as a songwriter continues to evolve and show new promise”

- John Shepherd

Musician, friend to the band, and contriuting editor of mayhem.com


Shot in the Dark is now availalbe worldwide.

 

BANDCAMP: https://bobbymahoneymusic.bandcamp.com/album/shot-in-the-dark


SOUNDCLOUD: https://soundcloud.com/bobbymahoneymusic/sets/shot-in-the-dark-bobby-mahoney-and-the-seventh-son

"Shot in the Dark" Video Out NOW!

///SHOT IN THE DARK- VIDEO

 

Produced by Zack Morrison
Photographed by Adam Volerich and Zack Morrison

Song recorded by Joe Larkin at William Paterson University


The "Shot in the Dark" album will be available digitally Friday July 8th.

Record Release Show @ The Stone Pony on Sunday July 10th!
https://www.facebook.com/events/115600385527567/

 

 

“Shot in the Dark”: New Record and Summer Tour!

“We wanted to make a record that captured the energy of the band live. We wanted it to be raw, imperfect, and honest, while letting the songs speak for themselves, and we really could not be more excited about it all.”


Shot in the Dark will be available digitally on July 8th via Bandcamp, Spotify, iTunes, etc., and July 10th on CD.


As if that wasn’t enough good news, the band will also be doing their biggest tour to date to support the new record, including a record release party at The Stone Pony in Asbury Park on 7/10 with special guests Backyard Superheroes, Goodbye Tiger, and Will Wood and the Tapeworms!


Bobby Mahoney and the Seventh Son

“Shot in the Dark” Summer Tour 2016

6/2 The Meatlocker- Montclair, NJ
6/3 Firehouse 13- Providence, RI
6/4 PA's Lounge- Somerville, MA
6/18 Bowery Ballroom- NYC
6/25 LobsterFest- Bradley Beach, NJ
*7/10 The Stone Pony- Asbury Park, NJ*
7/16 Buzzbin- Canton, OH
7/18 Be Here Now- Muncie, IN
7/19 Daisy Dukes- Nashville, TN
7/20 Swayze's- Marietta, GA
7/21 Double Door Inn- Charlotte, NC
7/22 The Josie House- Richmond, VA
7/30 Chickie and Pete's- Egg Harbor, NJ

8/13 APYC- Asbury Park, NJ

8/19 Arlene's Grocery- NYC

9/9 The Court Tavern- New Brunswick, NJ


More dates TBA!

 

Thanks so much for all the continued support, and we will see you on the road!




Upcoming Shows! Winter/Spring 2016

Bobby Mahoney and the Seventh Son will be doing a handful of shows over the next few months while they begin work on their newest studio project, which is due this Summer! More shows TBA!

Upcoming Shows! Winter/Spring 2016

2/22 Wonder Bar- Asbury Park, NJ

2/26 Paul's Tavern- Belmar, NJ

3/4 Monmouth University- West Long Branch, NJ

3/18 Sammy's Patio- Revere, MA

3/19 APYC- Asbury Park, NJ

4/1 Open Arts Stage- Bordentown, NJ

 

Final Shows of 2015

Final Shows in 2015

2015 has been a big year for us. Bittersweet at times, for no band is without growing pains, but it has really been a fun year with a lot of amazing nights and memories. I cannot wait to see what 2016 has in store for us!

However, before we get to the New Year, we have many faces to melt at our final four shows of the year! If you haven't been out to a show yet, now is the time! If you have seen us 50 times, your 51st show will be the best one yet!

So get out of bed, put on your finest leather jacket, and get your ass to a gig! December 2015 won't know what hit it!

12/11- Firehouse 13- Providence, RI

12/12- PA's Lounge- Somerville, MA

12/19- The Court Tavern- New Brunswick, NJ

12/21- The Wonder Bar- Asbury Park, NJ

_____________

Photo by: Mitchell Bilus

Behind the Song: Don't Ever Love Me

Behind the Song: “Don’t Ever Love Me”

Behind the Song: Don't Ever Love Me 

            “Don’t Ever Love Me” was the second single we released for “The Outskirts”. One day Jon and I were writing over Skype and iPhone voice memos, and he sent me the barebones of a riff with this cool F#-F-F# movement and he told me to “run with it”. So I did. At the time, I was taking the Songwriting I class at William Paterson with Professor Martin Briley (“Salt In My Tears”, Celine Dion, Shinedown, etc.). We spent one lecture talking about “Chord Pacing” and how as the song progresses, the pace of the chords should change (ex. 4 measure changes to 2 or 1, for more movement) then we were told to write a song utilizing this concept.

            I went back to my dorm that week and went back to the riff Jon had sent me and began tweaking it. I used the chord pacing idea in the verse, going from 1 measure changes to 2 beat changes in the second half. It gives the song a bit more movement, and on the record, the left and right panning, combined with Jon and I playing octaves of each other really highlighted this change and made it pop.

            In the studio, we spent a lot of time on the vocals. I was in the booth for a couple of hours doing the falsetto harmonies, and we had many takes of gang vocals in the choruses, the bridge, and the outro. We had another set of gangs doing a round with the “I don’t want to be addicted” part at the end, but we ended up scrapping it because it was becoming too cluttered- but it was cool nonetheless.

            Dan came up with the harmonic, “Edge-esque” guitar part in the beginning of the tune, and I think that’s one of the things that helps set it apart from the other tunes on the record. It’s a really cool part. As a pop, song I think it is probably a close second in catchiness to “Another Deadbeat Summer” but I think this song has a little more of an emotional charge to it.

            Lyrically, I wanted to write about two broken people, and one of them knowing that the best thing for the other person was to stay away from them. It takes a lot of courage to admit you love someone, but it takes an entirely different level of courage and restraint to say “I love you, but you shouldn’t love me, for your own good”. I really enjoyed the idea of love being an addiction because it absolutely is as potent as any drug out there. It is something you crave, and the one character knows that if she lets herself fall, she will get completely hooked again, and she can’t handle being broken again. She also doesn’t want to be the one to break him.

            The song is each character stating their case and pleading with the other. Zack Morrison brought this aspect of the song to life in the video he directed. The beginning of the video (and the song) starts out like any date would, and it has an overall happy tone to it. As the song progresses, each character begins to drop the ruse and begins to show their true feelings, one being completely head over heels, and the other hesitant to feel the same. By the end of the song, they are screaming at each other because they are just so frustrated with the situation. It doesn’t have a happy ending- at least in this chapter of the story.

Stay tuned for more "Behind the Song" entries.

Best,

Bobby

_______________

Photo by: Phil Shepherd

 

Behind the Song: Done

After we released “Friends in Low Places” in 2014, every few weeks we released a small article about each song, going through the inspiration, the songwriting process, and the recording of each tune. We really enjoyed doing this, so we are going to do it again for “The Outskirts”. Without further ado… 

“Done”


            The first song on “The Outskirts”, and also the first radio single (release on 95.9 WRAT), “Done” is probably the heaviest song in our catalog to date. This song was Jon’s baby on the record. He brought the riff, the basic format of the song, and the title to us at a rehearsal in Joe Larkin’s studio all the way back in August of 2014. Originally, the song started with the fuzz bass, then eventually took a Zeppelin-esque turn and broke down to this free-form section before screaming back a la “Whole Lotta Love”. Eventually, we decided to down size it, while keeping the main riff and overall tone. Jon came back with a near complete arrangement, and I wrote the lyrics for the verses and the chorus, as Jon had the “No more lies…” outro.

            Lyrically the song is a blunt look at the cycle of falling in love, heartbreak, rebounding, and so on and so forth. It is also a snapshot of the “hook-up” culture and casual sex that our generation has adopted. Its about being fed up with that cycle and culture, and struggling to find something more meaningful in text messages sent at 3am.

             While it is our heaviest song, I think it is our most technical and toughest to play. Those Foo Fighters- style accents in the verses took a lot of practice to synch up and get right, between all of us, and especially while I was singing. The fuzz-bass intro w/ that slide in was a huge part of the song from day one, and that’s actually me playing bass on the recording for the intro- I was very picky about how long the slide-in was, and wanted to make sure it had the raw attitude and feel that we envisioned. We also spent a lot of time getting the guitars to sound “larger-than-life” which would sent the tone for all the guitars on the entire record. We used AC/DC’s “Rock or Bust” as a template for what we wanted the guitars to be- raw, loud, and powerful. All the guitar parts were recorded with Blackstar Amps, so we were able to get that “Marshall-y” sound with a bit of a modern kick.

            One fun fact about the track was that at one point, we doubled my vocal track, and in Pro Tools, dropped one of them down an octave to get a bit more low-end and to make it grittier, but for a while that was all I could hear, and I hated it, and I refused to release the song until we took it out, and to this day, I am crazy enough to think I can still hear it- but that’s my own insanity. The recording process definitely takes a toll on my mind!

Stay tuned for the next installments of “Behind the Song”, and see you on the road!

Best,

Bobby

New Video- "The Outskirts"

 

"The Outskirts"

Directed by Zack Morrison

"The Outskirts" Now Available Worldwide

Bobby Mahoney and the Seventh Son's sophomore record "The Outskirts" is now available in physical copies, as well as on iTunes, Spotify, Bandcamp, and more.


 of The Aquarian Weekly said "If you’re looking for something that has the typical sounds of the Jersey Shore, The Outskirts probably isn’t for you. The record steps far outside those boundaries, at times dancing the razor’s edge of hardcore and metal before settling into a boisterous center of raw rock and roll," and "The Outskirts is an unbridled ride across style, attitude and the rebellious tube-fueled angst of an artist not satisfied to tread water."


Download "The Outskirts": https://bobbymahoneymusic.bandcamp.com/album/the-outskirts

Bobby Mahoney and the Seventh Son to release new album "The Outskirts" July 18

After several months of touring and recording, Bobby Mahoney and the Seventh Son has announced the group's second full-length studio album. 

The band will release The Outskirts, the follow-up to 2014's Friends in Low Places, later this summer on July 18. The album will be available both digitally and in hard copy form, and will be an independent project.

The Outskirts features 10 tracks, with the first single "Done" to be released in May. The project also features songs such as "Don't Ever Love Me," "Jackie Was a Renegade" and the title track, "The Outskirts." Songs on the album were written and composed once again by Bobby Mahoney and Jon Alba.

"I think we have matured a lot in the last year and that is reflected in the songs," Mahoney said. "I genuinely think this is the best writing we have done to date. The songs are fun as hell to play, and I cannot wait to start busting more of them out live. We have been working on some of these songs since July and August of 2014."

"It's a hard rock record all the way," Alba said. "We really pushed the elements with the songwriting, looking to be more creative than what is on Friends in Low Places. There are some cool things we've never tried before, which you'll hear immediately with the release of 'Done.'"

The Outskirts was recorded at Quiver Audio Studios in New York City. It will see the return of Max Aharon as producer and sound engineer. 

"We were happy to work with [Max] again. He knows us better than we do musically, and he was an obvious first choice to work with us again. He has a lot of experience and we are often on the same page from a production style. He pushes us to play better." Mahoney said.

Accompanying the album release will be a show at The Saint in Asbury Park, New Jersey July 18. Details regarding tickets will be released at a later date.

Follow Bobby Mahoney and the Seventh Son on Facebook and Twitter for more information.

Make Your Own Luck: The story behind the EP

The following is an open letter from Bobby Mahoney

“You have to make your own luck,” is probably the best advice anyone has ever given me about perusing a career in music, or about life in general. No one is going to hand you anything, and you aren’t going to get “discovered” while singing 90s songs in your shower. You have to create your own opportunities.

While working with my partner in crime, Jon Alba on the next Seventh Son record, I found myself writing a bunch of mellow acoustic songs in between writing kick ass hard rock tunes (if I may say so ourselves). I was listening to a lot of Neil Young, Jesse Malin, Brian Fallon, Johnny Cash and Paul Simon at the time. I hadn’t released any acoustic tunes since 2012, and it was a voice and style that I wanted to reconnect to before we jump right back into electric, “in your face” Seventh Son mode.

The songs were all written between July of 2014 and February of 2015, and they all had varying inspiration. I tried to be more conversational with the lyrics, getting away from the grandiose and exaggerated ideas found on Friends in Low Places. I wanted to the songs to be simple and short.

The EP kicks off with the song “Mayhem,” which was probably the most blatant, “hey girl I used to really like, this song is about you” song I’ve written thus far in my career. On the other songs, I take composites of other people, events, places, and combine them and change details to fit exactly what I am trying to convey, but on this song, each section has its own specific memory and I really didn’t change all that much from real life, to the recording. I feel extremely close to this song, and that’s probably not the best thing for my sanity, but any chance at salvaging that has long since past. In the original version of the lyrics, I used the word “fuck” a generous-amount, and I eventually went back and tried to be more eloquent about my feelings. I think that actually helped the song in the end. I really liked the idea of using the title “Mayhem” because it evokes chaotic and violent images that would typically be found in a heavier tune, but it is a sweet acoustic ballad. I think that contrast really makes the song.

Next, “Called it Quits,” which is probably my mother’s least favorite song I’ve written, but that’s okay – I still enjoy it. I wrote this song after listening to a lot of emo-punk bands, such as The Menzingers, and Modern Baseball. I wanted to deliver that same sense of indifference and informality in the delivery of the lyric. For the “hope its all right, hope its okay” portion, I channeled Cobain from “All Apologies,” at least that is what I envisioned. Last year I found myself wandering around campus at night with my iPod on shuffle, just listening to whatever and enjoying the solitude of the night, and this song was born from a few of those nights. “I don’t usually take long peaceful walks, but it is still not dark out yet.”

“Anna” is the third song on the EP, and it is loosely based on someone I knew briefly when I was younger, who was working on writing a book back when we were in middle school or junior high. The concept of writing a book at such a young age really impressed me, and I don’t know if she ever finished it or anything, but the song hopes that she didn’t change and eventually finished the book. We played this as a band one time in rehearsal and it was almost a Country-esque ballad, but I opted to just play it solo acoustic. I wouldn’t be surprised to see a bunch of these songs getting the band treatment over the next few years.

“Troubled Breeze” is about the Court Tavern on Church Street in New Brunswick. There is this stop sign that is almost completely covered in stickers from all the bands that have played there, and I have spent a lot of time just standing under it talking to a lot of interesting characters as they bum cigarettes and talk about whatever bands they love or hate. When I was younger, I had a song called “Troubled Breeze” that I played on piano. This song has nothing to do with that, other than I recycled the title, but I’ve always liked the imagery.

The penultimate song on the EP is “Letters From the End of the World,” and this would be the “rocker” of the bunch by default because the others are so mellow. I name check my friend Kevin Dziuba’s band “Check Your Morals” in the first verse. When I think about the end of the world, I wonder if some other beings come after us, will they hear the songs, read the books, letters, and graffiti on the walls and understand who we were, or will everything get lost? It is pretty abstract, but it was really interesting to think about trying to figure out who we are now solely by the art. Will it all hold up over time? Who knows.

“Writing Our Own Eulogies” sort of follows the idea of “Letters,” but it’s a more personal “how will I be remembered?” We all have our own ideas of who we are and what we are doing, but I wanted to write about making the best of the time we have because we all want to be remembered for our positive accomplishments, which isn’t always easy. People can be petty and judgmental and it is unfortunate but people love to drag people down. The idea of not being remembered, or remembered for the right reasons honestly scares the shit out of me, and that is what the song is about. While it is extremely morbid, we have all had the late night, deep, heart-to-heart conversations about everything from ex-girlfriends to our own mortality and this song came out of one in particular.

I spent a lot of time debating whether or not to release these songs now, with releasing the next Seventh Son record this summer, but in the end I wanted these songs to be heard, and I wanted them to be heard now. Our super fan, Nick Passell, said, “its a good appetizer to what will hopefully be a great entrée” and that was the point. Its not supposed to be groundbreaking, its not supposed to sound perfect, it is just a few simple, yet powerful songs that I wanted to sing in a raw, live format. For most of the songs, the vocals were recorded directly with the guitar, in order to get that live feel. While I know this isn’t the high-energy rock sound that people are used to from me, I really wanted to record these songs for me because I felt I needed to sing them at this moment in time. That being said, I am very proud of this project, and I hope you all enjoy it!

You have to make your own luck – so I did.

“Luck” can be found on Bandcamp.

 

Bobby Mahoney to release digital acoustic EP "Luck" April 12

Album art by Elijah Reiss

In the first of a series of news to be released over the course of the next few months, Bobby Mahoney announced Sunday the release of his next compilation.

Luck, an acoustic EP, will be digitally-released April 12 exclusively through Bandcamp. Those who download will be able to name their own price for the album. 

"It's a collection of a few acoustic tracks I wrote over the last few months that I thought would be best showcases in a minimal, acoustic setting," Mahoney said.

Recorded in February 2015 at William Paterson University in Wayne, New Jersey, the EP sees the return of Max Aharon as producer and engineer. Aharon served the same roles for Bobby Mahoney and the Seventh Son's Friends in Low Places, the full-band album released last June. The project also received assistance from Nicco DiRenzi, who appeared on a track on the previous album.

No other members of Bobby Mahoney and the Seventh Son appear on the record. The band will be announcing a new project shortly.

The acoustic EP will be his first solo endeavor since 2012's Delicate Fall From Grace album, which earned Mahoney a nomination for "Top Acoustic Act" at the 2013 Asbury Music Awards.

Mahoney will be playing several acoustic shows to promote the EP. Stay with BobbyMahoneyMusic.com to find out more information about upcoming shows, and follow Bobby Mahoney and the Seventh Son on Facebook and Twitter.

For press inquiries, please contact BobbyMahoney20@gmail.com.

Statement from Bobby Mahoney and the Seventh Son

Sunday night, Bobby Mahoney and the Seventh Son announced Dan Guerron as its new bassist with the departure of Joe Larkin.

Guerron has since informed the band he has elected not to move forward with his decision to join. The band will continue with other options without disruptions, recording and touring as scheduled.

Upcoming tour dates for Bobby Mahoney and the Seventh Son can be found below.

Behind the Song: "Star-Crossed"

Courtesy: Nathalie Le Pennec

It's now been more than seven months since the release of Bobby Mahoney and the Seventh Son's debut full-length album, Friends in Low Places. Despite the time, the songs remain fresh for much of the loyal fanbase.

One of the favorites for the crowd continues to be "Star-Crossed." Bobby and Jon discuss track No. 8 in the newest "Behind the Song."

Where did you draw inspiration for "Star-Crossed?"

BM: "I drew inspiration from 'Peter Pan,' 'West Side Story,' 'Romeo and Juliet' and 'Bonnie and Clyde.' A lot of fucked up love stories that were doomed to fail. These relationships were completely romanticized and ill-advised, but they were dumb and in love and followed their hearts (usually to their own demise)."

JA: "I didn't have much to say with the lyrics for this one, but very much its aura. We didn't really have a true bombastic, epic-in-sound track yet for the album at that point, and that's something I'm big on. So I would say I had a pretty big influence on the track sounding (audibly) how it does."

How did the song change since how you initially wrote it?

BM: "What ended up being the chorus, was originally the bridge and at Jon’s suggestion, I re-worked the song and it came out to how it is on the record. There was also a third verse that we cut in order to streamline the song, but we use it as a live intro to the song. I wish I didn’t have to cut it, but I’m glad we were able to repurpose it."

JA: "The song was originally three verses, a bridge and a chorus. He was going for something different, and I respect that, but when I heard the bridge, I knew that was the catch. That was the part I remembered from it. That was the part I could see thousands singing along to at once. I begged him to redo it with that as a chorus, throw in a solo and have this huge ending. I actually ended up composing the drums for this song, with two sticks I had laying around and a bedspread. I also wrote the lead for the song that Dan plays live."

What's your favorite element of the song?

BM: "I really enjoy the verses and the solo. The crowd usually sings the chorus, so I also enjoy that aspect of it."

JA: "Obviously the chorus is great, but my favorite part of the song is undoubtedly the solo. It tells a story, which I beg and push Bobby to do every single time he records one. It's actually my favorite part of the entire album."

This is one of the poppier songs on the album. Were you trying to write one like that?

BM: "Not really. When I sit down to write, I don’t go 'oh I’m going to write a pop song, or a love song' I just put the pen to the paper and let my mind wander until I find something that feels right."

JA: "I don't think it hurt that we wrote one. I wanted this enormous sounding anthem of sorts. I think, to a degree, that gets across."

How is it represented live?

BM: "Like I said, we use the cut third verse as the intro, and the crowd really gets into this song because of the easy, catchy chorus. It is always a fun, high-energy song to play live."

JA: "It's the only song that we play I use effects on. So that's pretty cool. Crowd really gets into this one, and I give a nice lead-in to Bobby's solo. Dan and Joe add a lot on backup vocals too."

Where does it stand on the album for you?

BM: "It is the only full 'love' song on the record, and the main character is referring to the same girl he is refers to in the end of 'Scoundrels.'"

JA: "I personally would have placed it after 'Deadbeat' on the album, but I get why it comes after 'Guilden Street.' It works."

Will this one stick around as you enter Another Deadbeat Tour?

BM: "I don’t see why not. I like it and the band likes it and the crowd likes it. Even Joe sings along."

JA: "Not my say, but I sure hope so. Maybe stagger it a bit to make it more special."

Mahoney also noted he recorded all the leads and solos for the song in one take, a rarity these days for musicians.

Show Report - Light of Day, 1/16/15

Photo courtesy: Conni Freestone

Bobby Mahoney and the Seventh Son has been a little busy over the past few months...so we apologize for the lack of show reports.

But that's not a bad thing of course. In fact, 2014 was the busiest year the band ever had. So needless to say, 2015 was due for a big start.

The band took The Saint by storm Jan. 3, debuting a slew of new material and rocked Bar A in Belmar, New Jersey in honor of Clarence Clemons. But it would be Friday, Jan. 16 that would be etched in the history of Seventh Son lore. And nonetheless, it was for a good cause. 

Just a couple of months after taking to Canada for the foundation, Light of Day brought itself to New Jersey for what has annually become one of the biggest weeks in the Tri-State area. And this year, the Seventh Son band was part of it.

Photo courtesy: Jeff Ross

Hundreds graced The Stone Pony in Asbury Park for the second-biggest show of the whole weekend. While of course Bobby & Co. would be featured, they would be a small footnote on a tremendous bill of some of the most talented rockers and songwriters in the world today. Names like James Maddock, Ten Ton Mojo, Willie Nile among others were there to help raise money to cure Parkinson's Disease, and as Canada showed, Light of Day truly is one of a kind.

It would be a short set for the guys, but nonetheless, one of the most exciting in the band's history. With barely any space to move in the audience, Seventh Son hit the stage with an explosive start. "New Age Outlaws," fresh with its extended introduction, kickstarted the five guys into a frenzy, with Bobby and Jon sharing the microphone as the song climaxed to an immense crash.

In keeping emphasis on power, the band launched into the recently-debuted ".38 Special." Hamming it up more than ever, Bobby motioned for Jon to "shoot [him] down," igniting a breakdown fueled by musical craftiness. The bass, interweaving with breaks left open by the guitars and drums, created a spectacle for the crowd.

A tight version of "Danger Dan" led way for the always powerful "Scoundrels," which was cut short due to time constraints. However, the band introductions allowed for a slowing down of the set, setting the perfect pace for what would be the finale.

Photo courtesy: Julie Grant

"Another Deadbeat Summer" took its familiar spot as the show closer, but this time, it was chaotic. Danny Gochnour of Joe Grushecky and the Houserockers, "Mouth of the South [Jersey]" Gary Tripieddi, Johnny Pisano of the Willie Nile Band, Joe Rapolla, Eddie Mac of Projex and even Bobby's mother herself joined the band on stage among several others to set the table for what would eventually prove itself as one of the most epic nights of Light of Day.

It was one of those nights where you realize there's something special in the air. And whether it was the electricity of a Mahoney guitar solo, the high voltage brought on by a Marshall with some mojo, the showmanship of a man from Bleecker Street or the dedication of the tremendous Light of Day staff, it all just came together.

And we're just around the corner until next year.

Setlist

1. New Age Outlaws

2. .38 Special

3. Danger Dan

4. Scoundrels

5. Another Deadbeat Summer

Bobby Mahoney and the Seventh Son to play the 2014 Asbury Park Music Awards

 

ASBURY PARK, N.J. --- After being nominated for two Asbury Music Awards in 2013, Bobby Mahoney and the Seventh Son have been announced as a musical guest for the 2014 awards on Dec. 18, 2014. The event will once again be held at the Asbury Park-famous Stone Pony.

"Asbury Park has been my musical home since I was 15," Bobby Mahoney, lead singer and guitarist for the band said. "And I am humbled and honored to be playing the Asbury Music Awards with so many great artists."

The band will join the likes of Deal Casino, Eastbourne, Sofia Nicole among many others as performers for the evening.

It was a busy 2014 for Bobby Mahoney and the Seventh Son, as the band released its debut full-length studio album, Friends in Low Places, to critical-acclaim. Jersey shore outlet The Aquarian had the following about the album in July:

"Friends In Low Places marks Mahoney’s return to the band format and a more tumultuous and concentrated rock and roll sound. Defiant and green, this record logs adolescent 'life in the fast lane'recorded and learned by the young men who wrote it."

In June, the band released the first album's first music video, "Another Deadbeat Summer." It features shots of not just the shore, but a live performance at the Asbury Park-famous venue The Saint.

The group is currently in the midst of touring to support the album, which has included to stops in Canada as part of Light of Day Canada.

"A lot of hard work went into the past year with this band," rhythm guitarist Jon Alba added. "We are very excited to share the stage with such talented acts and to represent a place we feel is one of our adopted homes."

In 2013, the band was nominated for "Top Young Band," while Mahoney himself was nominated for "Top Male Acoustic Act."

Doors will be at 6 p.m., while Bobby Mahoney and the Seventh Son hits the stage at 7:25 p.m. Advance tickets for the event can be purchased at the box office at The Saint and The Stone Pony, or in advance via Ticketmaster or Ticketweb.

For more information on the event, visit the official website of the awards or its official Facebook page.

Jon reflects on Light of Day Canada

Photo courtesy: Felicia McIntosh

***The following is a personal essay from Bobby Mahoney and the Seventh Son rhythm guitarist Jon Alba***

It's funny how much can be accomplished in such a short period of time.

When we began our trip up to Canada, the second in 2014, Bobby looked at me and asked if I ever thought we'd be on a festival bill in Canada four years ago. The reality? Absolutely not.

As many are aware, the band started as a part-time thing. It was meant for one gig, maybe a couple. To think we'd be able to take it any measure beyond that is odd to think about. But to do two mini-Ontario tours in one year? No way.

We were very fortunate to be part of what is a very special annual event for the first time as a unit. For those unaware, Light of Day Canada generates funds through a series of concerts featuring some of the best live acts in the business, with the money going towards Parkinson's Disease research. It's a win-win for all involved, whether on the stage, in front of it or in organization. When we got the call to come open up the shows, it was a no-brainer.

Rather than give a typical show-by-show report, I figured it may be interesting to go through each show from our personal perspective and detail just how special this past weekend was. There wasn't a night I got to sleep before 4 a.m., but every single bit of it was worth it. And here's why.

After a multi-day drive, we reached Niagara Falls only to hitch a bus to Toronto for the first set of shows, originally slated to be the last show at the legendary El Mocambo. The bus ride featured all of those involved in the shows, including John Cafferty and the Beaver Brown Band, Joe Grushecky and the Houserockers, Joe D'Urso & Stone Caravan, among many others. Rather than close our eyes for the ride, we wanted to know the stories of these entities, how they got where they were. I'm the oldest member in the band at the slender age of 21, there was plenty to learn.

As a journalist-in-training (that's my real job, at least), I found their stories to be incredibly captivating. While Bobby hears a lot of them from time to time, it was my personal first glimpse at where these great acts came from, both personally and professionally. D'Urso spent time in my shoes working towards a career in television. Jeffrey "Joffo" Simmons of the Houserockers grew up alongside Willie Stargell's children amidst the run of the "We Are Family" Pittsburgh Pirates of 1979.

Of course, the musical advice was thrown in and appreciated significantly, but for me, it's those stories that are just as interesting.

The last time the band was in Toronto, turnout was a bit lower than expected. But this time, in what was intended to be the venue's final show, that would be far from the case. Hundreds (well over the capacity of the club) packed the floor to witness the sendoff for a venue that had hosted acts like the Rolling Stones, Stevie Ray Vaughn and others - but tonight, the Seventh Son would be the one etching its name into the walls.

We played that show like our life depended on it. Twenty-five consecutive minutes of heart-racing, sweat-inducing rock n' roll (I use those adjectives because that's sure as hell what it felt like on the stage). The crowd at the Elmo was perhaps the best of the three shows, and fed us back the energy we needed to get things kicked off right. Danny Gochnour of the Houserockers and Eddie Manion of E Street Band fame joined us for our final tune, and as a music fan and enthusiast, time seemed to stop for me. It was a moment on stage I'll never forget, and I, alongside the rest of the band, cannot thank them enough for making something special happen.

Photo courtesy: Jeff Ross

Thankfully, the club was saved at the 11th hour, by Canadian billionaire Michael Wekerle. We were thrilled to see Wekerle enjoy our set, and even posed for a couple pictures with him afterwards (alongside throwing him a copy of Friends in Low Places, of course).

Set

1. Teenagers Too

2. Hit The Town

3. Danger Dan

4. Scoundrels

5. Another Deadbeat Summer

As we returned to Niagara close to 5 a.m., we then awoke for lunch with the whole gang. It was during this lunch I was able to grasp a real appreciation for one person in particular.

Joining LOD Canada this year was Pat Travers, a musical journeyman who has worked with some of the biggest names in the industry throughout his career. Travers, like myself, is a hard rock enthusiast, and the framework of his playing indicates pure brilliance through power chords and note intricacy. During lunch, we struck up conversation with him, as he would go into stories about AC/DC (one of the primary influences of Bobby's and mine), super-producer Mutt Lange among other topics. The experiences were great to hear about, but the next day, Travers would treat us to an intimate conversation about the inner-workings of the guitar, and how he goes about tackling it every time he picks it up.

Bobby, the band and myself in particular cannot be more lucky to have gotten a chance to just absorb that information and knowledge. Simply incredible. And he kicked ass as well on stage.

Nonetheless, Friday brought the Niagara show to the Greg Frewin Theatre. I was fortunate enough to be joined by my old podcasting buddy Tanner Kish, who was able to catch the band for the first time.

This show was about as special of a Bobby Mahoney and the Seventh Son show you'll ever see. The theater, intimate in its own fashion, set the scene for the first ever (and long-rehearsed) full band performance of "Guilden Street." The song was done in honor of LOD Niagara figureheard David Rotella, who has been (alongside his son Evan) an incredible supportor of the band.

Photo courtesy: Felicia McIntosh

I cannot accurately describe the feeling starting the show off with that C-chord in a silent theater. I rarely get nervous before a show, but I had butterflies. But I'm thrilled with how the song received new life, as the band showed up to bring it.

"Scoundrels" followed suit, and in what may have been the best performance the song has ever had, brought a sort of electricity to the room. I'm not sure I've ever had so much fun on one song in any show I've been a part of with this band as that one. The band was locked-in. Even though it was a shorter set, Niagara brought one of the most intense stage experiences we have had to date.

Set

1. Guilden Street

2. Scoundrels

3. Star-Crossed

4. Another Deadbeat Summer


Photo courtesy: Felicia McIntosh

After another late night, we woke up to head laterally across Ontario towards Kingston, an acoustic set with Bobby and myself. Bobby and I are the lone remaining members of the original Seventh Son lineup, it all goes back to the two of us. 

It's for that reason I find it hard, no matter what my own personal schedule be, to pass up doing a duet performance.

The BluMartini played perfect host to the short set we pumped out, which, in a fitting manner, began with "Worrisome Child." It's a song we can play in our sleep, but there's almost a primal feeling still every single time when we get to the solo, one Bobby rips to shreds with his distortion. In that moment, we play back to what we are at our root: The lead and the rhythm.

Kingston was receptive to the rest of the set, and we stuck around to show our fellow musicians the respect we have for them and thanking them for embracing our presence on the leg.

Set

1. Worrisome Child

2. Star-Crossed

3. Another Deadbeat Summer

The reality is, I'm not entirely sure how much time I have left in this band with the real world quickly approaching me. But I wanted to take the time to write this to show my sheer gratification I have for all of those who have given us an opportunity to, even if for just a weekend, pretend to actually be rock stars. We as a band, and as people, embraced every minute of it.

And then there was the time Vinny "Big Pussy" Pastore made me look up his movies upon his request.

I speak on behalf of the band when I say a major special thanks to Gord and Ginette, without whom the shows would not have run. Gord is an incredible music mind who I never get tired of hearing stories from, and Ginette is one of the sweetest people you'll ever run into. Another thanks as well again to David Rotella for genuinely getting behind everything we do. A shoutout also goes to the rest of the LOD Canada crew, including Tony Serra and Sam Grasso, for making all of this happen.

And of course, all the best to the man behind it all, Mr. Bob Benjamin.

As far as the musicians and people, there is no one better. Whether it's Danny and his Bobby Mahoney-hating/loving significant other Jamie, Joe D'Urso, "Mr. Lou" DeMartino, our superfans who made the trips just to see us, or anyone else, we cannot thank you enough for letting us be a part of something this special. We were humbled to be around musicians and individuals with as much passion as you guys.

I am not sure if I will ever get to be a part of something this special ever again. But all I can say is, I sure hope it's just around the corner...

Photo courtesy: Joey Cartwright


Bobby Mahoney and the Seventh Son to release "New Age Outlaws" music video Thursday

Courtesy: Mitch Bilus

Four months after the release of the highly-popular music video for "Another Deadbeat Summer" off the debut full-band studio album Friends in Low Places, Bobby Mahoney and the Seventh Son will release another video to promote the compilation.

"New Age Outlaws," originally released as the first single off the album, will debut its music video Thursday night. Directed and filmed by Zack Morrison, the piece will mark the second time the two entities have worked together on a music video.

"Once again, we had the chance to work with the great Zack Morrison," Mahoney said. "Zack is an extremely talented up-and-comer in the film industry. He graduated from Rutgers and is now at Columbia for graduate school for film. Not only does he produce excellent film work but he is also a passionate music lover. It is always great to work with him, as well as to see him enjoying our music at shows. He has helped us out a lot in the past year. I look forward to seeing all the great things he will accomplish."

The video was shot in 4K, also known as "super HD," with a RED Epic Cinema camera courtesy of Ideas United and Distinguished Filmmakers. It was filmed on Sept. 6, 2014 at The Court Tavern in New Brunswick, N.J. before a packed audience.

"This time around we went for a straight, no frills live video," Mahoney said. "I think it accentuates the rawness of 'New Age Outlaws.' It is arguably the hardest rocking song on the record, and we had a kick-ass time at the show filming. We don't have mosh pits at a lot of our shows, but one broke out while filming this video and it was an awesome vibe in the room and it gave the song the edginess it needed."

In addition to the video, the band will release preliminary dates for the winter leg of the Friends in Low Places Tour.

A second preview for the film can be found below.

Friends in Low Places is available via iTunes, Bandcamp, Spotify and various other outlets.

Behind the Song: "Guilden Street"

The seventh track on Friends in Low Places is a sharp curve from the rest of the album. 

"Guilden Street" starts as a somber acoustic reflection piece, and explodes into something much more. It has quickly become a fan-favorite, but is seldom played live.

Describe the origins of "Guilden Street," the place and song.

BM: "Guilden Street is a street in New Brunswick, N.J. that some friends used to have a house on. This house was notorious for insane nights of teenage debachary."

JA: "Guilden Street started as an acoustic demo that Bobby put on YouTube. He felt strongly about it for the album, and while I was heistant at first, we figured we'd just lay it down and see what we could do with it."

How was the song conceived?

BM: "The song was written based off a series of events that took place at this house, and how I felt out of place. Seeing my friends turning into different people over the years, or even the course of one night, is really what the song is about. Not fitting in with your friends as they change and grow up, and how you have less and less in common is part of life - it happens. It all hit me at this house party one night, and that is what inspired the song. I also never really understood the whole 'partying' thing that most people my age do. I just never saw the appeal to drinking or doing drugs. Not that I am some annoying 'Straight Edge' advocate that judges people, or a D.A.R.E. officer, but I just never really got into that stuff. But to each their own."

JA: "I wasn't there, but everything seems to be pretty literal in the song. You can follow along the storyline fairly easily, as its written to reflect how the night unfolds. It fits really well following up 'Deadbeat' because things are really beginning to crash and burn for the main character."

Describe the recording process.

BM: "The acoustic guitar and lead vocals were recorded by me in the studio, and then we brought in Joe Larkin to sing some harmonies with me to make it sound huge. He did a great job and I think his vocals really make the studio version of the song come to life and stand out. Max then did the snare drum part, and I wrote the string quartet part and added it in later."

JA: "We've mentioned throughout all of these how much Bobby and I argued over elements of the album. 'Guilden Street' was one of my biggest contentions. I believed in the song, but not the original presentation. The song was laid down vocally and acoustically, and that was originally to be it. I had initially conceived a full band version of the song, with it being intended to close the album in the same exact way 'Self-Induced Exile' does. But we soon learned that version of the song would not work, and I pushed to add more elements to what had been recorded. We conceived the snare to resemble a drummer boy march, as the characters, as Bobby insinuates, are marching to their downfall. The other voices was Bobby's call, and the strings fell on both."

What are some of your favorite elements of the song?

BM: "Well like I said, Joe's vocals really tie it all together. I am also proud of the string parts, and the lyrics. These are some of my most honest lyrics I have ever written."

JA: "The harmonies definitely are awesome. There's a lot going on, which is cool. I think once the snare hits, the song really explodes, which creates an awesome sonic moment on the album."

Are you surprised the song has gotten over the way it has?

BM: "Yeah, a lot of people tell me that they connected with this song the most on the album, which makes me happy. I fought tooth and nail to keep this song on the record, and I'm happy people appreciate it for what I intended it to be."

JA: "Very, and that's not a bad thing. I didn't think it would be a song people would connect to initially, but I think once we added the extra elements, it really becomes a standout track. And now, ironically, it's one of my favorites."

Do you have plans to keep the song around?

BM: "Yeah I think we have some cool ways to work the band in a little more with this one."

JA: "Stay tuned, Canada."

What are the struggles with playing the song live?

BM: "Most of the shows we play are hard rock/punk shows that don't have a lot of room for ballad type songs. People who are there to rock out, often times tune out the softer songs, or go to the bathroom or get a drink. But that is why I want to change up the arrangement a bit and give it a little more bite."

JA: "We've gotten experimental with it. Our live show is where we earn our money (jokes), so when we have to slow things down, it becomes a little harder to elongate a show. But the song is fun, and there are people who really love this song."

Any final thoughts?

BM: "It is a song about sticking to your guns. I am extremely proud of the song. Don't go to the bathroom when we play it."

JA: "I mean, if you gotta piss..."

Friends in Low Places is available via iTunes, Bandcamp, Spotify and various other outlets.